Google is a Bad Actor,
Introduction by Will Wainwright

A Recent News Flash In October: The headlines read "Google Claims ‘Quantum Supremacy,’ Marking a Major Milestone in Computing." Add that to 5G Technology and they will be Invincible. They say humanity is on the cusp of a new computing paradigm that promises to unlock new frontiers in science and beyond. But I personally worry about Google becoming a leader in Quantum computing and adding to Google’s already world wide tentacles. This would also apply to all social media being investigated by congress. Quantum Social Media would be the Ultimate Impenetrable Big Brother especially with 5G thrown into the mix. It would be calamitous and the quintessential time for a second coming. The Story & Video is Here


TIP: Often we refer you to a leading newspaper, in which case they will allow only a limited
number of views. If you have reached your max, just switch your browser and your count
will start over. You will also find this happening after a period of time.

Google News Flashes just keep piling up! On top of the previous news flash it was reported in mid November that “Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’ Gathers Personal Health Data on Millions of Americans”. Search giant is amassing health records from Ascension facilities in 21 states - patients not yet informed. The Story

STILL AGAIN - Just a week later the Headlines Read: "How Google shapes its research - and Why". The internet giant uses blacklists, algorithm tweaks and an army of contractors to influence what you see. The article occupied a full 7 pages of the WSJ. It is here.

Dr. Robert Epstein, a critic and perpetual thorn in the side of Google says ”Perhaps the most effective way to wield political influence in today's high-tech world is to donate money to a candidate and then to use technology to make sure he or she wins". The technology guarantees the win, and the donation guarantees allegiance, which Google has certainly tapped in recent years during the Obama administration.

Throughout 2016, Epstein, a left of center Democrat discussed the Google search algorithm manipulation in favor of presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. He estimated that as many as three million votes in the upcoming election could be shifted as a result.

In a 2017 article, Epstein criticized efforts by companies such as Google and Facebook, noting "the dangers in allowing big technology companies to decide which news stories are legitimate".

During the summer of ’19, Epstein warned Senator Ted Cruz and the Senate Judiciary Committee on "Google and Censorship through Search Engines" and of big tech election meddling during his testimony and that that Google can manipulate votes by using tools that they have at their disposal exclusively, and that no one can counteract them.

Epstein warned the senator of big tech election meddling during his testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee Hearing on "Google and Censorship through Search Engines". Watch out 2020! Epstein’s testimony is below.

I use DuckDuckGo, maybe you should too. And after you read the below, immagine Google's Omnipotence should they be first with the Quantum Computer written about here.

Furthure down this page is the story of Google's subtle threatening of those who would turn off "Cookies" to prevent their grasp on your computer. Yes, that is all you have to do!   (In case you dont know cookies are small text files stored in internet browsers that let companies follow users around the internet, gathering information such as which sites they visit and what ads they view or click. Hundreds of digital ad companies rely on them to collect user data.) - Will




Do you know what Google Knows


by Gabriel Weinberg, (I run a search engine Duck Duck Go.)


Did you know that unlike searching on DuckDuckGo, when you search on Google, they keep your search history forever? That means they know every search you’ve ever done on Google. That alone is pretty scary, but it’s just the shallow end of the very deep pool of data that they try to collect on people.


What most people don’t realize is that even if you don’t use any Google products directly, they’re still trying to track as much as they can about you. Google trackers have been found on 75% of the top million websites. This means they're also trying to track most everywhere you go on the internet, trying to slurp up your browsing history!


Most people also don’t know that Google runs most of the ads you see across the internet and in apps – you know those ones that follow you around everywhere? Yup, that’s Google, too. They aren’t really a search company anymore – they’re a tracking company. They are tracking as much as they can for these annoying and intrusive ads, including recording every time you see them, where you saw them, if you clicked on them, etc.

But even that’s not all…


If You Use Google Products


If you do use Google products, they try to track even more. In addition to tracking everything you’ve ever searched for on Google (e.g. “weird rash”), Google also tracks every video you’ve ever watched on YouTube. Many people actually don’t know that Google owns YouTube; now you know.


And if you use Android (yeah, Google owns that too), then Google is also usually tracking:

  • Every place you’ve been via Google Location Services.
  • How often you use your apps, when you use them, where you use them, and whom you use them to interact with.
          (This is just excessive by any measure.)
  • All of your text messages, which unlike on iOS, are not encrypted by default.
  • Your photos (even in some cases the ones you’ve deleted).

  • If you use Gmail, they of course also have all your e-mail messages. If you use Google Calendar, they know all your schedule. There’s a pattern here: For all Google products (Hangouts, Music, Drive, etc.), you can expect the same level of tracking: that is, pretty much anything they can track, they will.


    Oh, and if you use Google Home,  they also store a live recording of every command you’ve (or anyone else) has ever said to your device! Yes, you heard that right (err… they heard it) – you can check out all the recordings on your Google activity page. And if you use the Nest Camera system they have stored Video up to 30 days!. In this regard, Google sent a notice (9/25/19) to all Nest Camera Users stating "Good news! Your Nest Account is ready to migrate to a Google Account." That e-mail is Here


    Essentially, if you allow them to, they’ll track pretty close to, well, everything you do on the Internet. In fact, even if you tell them to stop tracking you, Google has been known to not really listen, for example with location history.


    You Become the Product


    Why does Google want all of your information anyway? Simple: as stated, Google isn’t a search company anymore, they’re a tracking company. All of these data points allow Google to build a pretty robust profile about you. In some ways, by keeping such close tabs on everything you do, they, at least in some ways, may know you better than you know yourself.


    And Google uses your personal profile to sell ads, not only on their search engine, but also on over three million other websites and apps. Every time you visit one of these sites or apps, Google is following you around with hyper-targeted ads.


    It’s exploitative. By allowing Google to collect all this info, you are allowing hundreds of thousands of advertisers to bid on serving you ads based on your sensitive personal data. Everyone involved is profiting from your information, except you. You are the product.


    It doesn’t have to be this way. It is entirely possible for a web-based business to be profitable without making you the product – since 2014, DuckDuckGo has been profitable without storing or sharing any personal information on people at all. You can read more about our business model here.


    The Myth of “Nothing to Hide”


    Some may argue that they have “nothing to hide,” so they are not concerned with the amount of information Google has collected and stored on them, but that argument is fundamentally flawed for many reasons.


    Everyone has information they want to keep private: Do you close the door when you go to the bathroom? Privacy is about control over your personal information. You don’t want it in the hands of everyone, and certainly don’t want people profiting on it without your consent or participation.


    In addition, privacy is essential to democratic institutions like voting and everyday situations such as getting medical care and performing financial transactions. Without it, there can be significant harms.


    On an individual level, lack of privacy leads to putting you into a filter bubble, getting manipulated by ads, discrimination, fraud, and identity theft. On a societal level, it can lead to deepened polarization and societal manipulation like we’ve unfortunately been seeing multiply in recent years.


    You Can Live Google Free


    Basically, Google tries to track too much. It’s creepy and simply just more information than one company should have on anyone.


    Thankfully, there are many good ways to reduce your Google footprint, even close to zero! If you are ready to live without Google, we have recommendations for services to replace their suite of products, as well as instructions for clearing your Google search history. It might feel like you are trapped in the Google-verse, but it is possible to break free.


    For starters, just switching the search engine for all your searches goes a long way. After all, you share your most intimate questions with your search engine; at the very least, shouldn’t those be kept private? If you switch to the DuckDuckGo app and extension you will not only make your searches anonymous, but also block Google’s most widespread and invasive trackers as you navigate the web.


    If you’re unfamiliar with DuckDuckGo, we are an Internet privacy company that empowers you to seamlessly take control of your personal information online, without any tradeoffs. We operate a search engine alternative to Google at http://duckduckgo.com, and offer a mobile app and desktop browser extension to protect you from Google, Facebook and other trackers, no matter where you go on the Internet.


    We’re also trying to educate users through our blog, social media, and a privacy “crash course” newsletter.




    A Warning by Google Against Blocking 'Cookies'


    Triggering Criticism, the tech company proposes "privacy sandbox" to set new standards after promising in May to let users restrict cookies.


    by Patience Haggin


    After promising to offer tools to let users limit “cookies,” tiny files that help internet and advertising companies track users, Alphabet’s Google suggested it won’t go any further, saying in a blog post that blocking cookies entirely could be counterproductive for user privacy.


    A recent post has drawn criticism in recent days from some privacy advocates who say Google’s Chrome internet browser should catch up to the stricter practices of rivals Firefox, Safari and DuckDuckGo..


    Ad tech companies and some digital publishers are wary of a major crackdown on cookies, saying it would hurt their businesses. In its post, Google said blocking cookies will encourage the rise of other, more nefarious methods of tracking internet users.


    These include so-called “fingerprinting” through which sites collect various signals about users, such as the fonts on their screens or the devices they use, to keep track of unique individuals as they browse the internet.


    Google said it was exploring new privacy technologies to enable personalized ads without compromising privacy, in a framework it called the “privacy sandbox.”


    As part of that initiative, Google proposed a so-called “privacy budget” that would impose a cap on the amount of data any site could request from a browser that might be used to identify a user.


    These include so-called “fingerprinting” through which sites collect various signals about users, such as the fonts on their screens or the devices they use, to keep track of unique individuals as they browse the internet.


    Google said it was exploring new privacy technologies to enable personalized ads without compromising privacy, in a framework it called the “privacy sandbox.”


    As part of that initiative, Google proposed a so-called “privacy budget” that would impose a cap on the amount of data any site could request from a browser that might be used to identify a user.


    Cookies are small text files stored in internet browsers that let companies follow users around the internet, gathering information such as which sites they visit and what ads they view or click. Hundreds of digital ad companies rely on them to collect user data.


    Google’s latest comments on the technology surprised some in the industry who assumed the company was working toward phasing out cookies after remarks Google made in spring 2019.


    The company promised at that time to launch new tools to restrict cookies. Those tools are going forward, but a full-on cookie crackdown isn’t happening.


    “Many folks were expecting Google to do something. When major competitors have come out with a much praised user feature, you can imagine they would come out with something that competes with that,” said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton University. “This notion that blocking cookies is bad for privacy is completely disingenuous.”


    “I interpret the announcement as giving Google an opportunity to try to show forward momentum on privacy while at the same time not doing anything that would negatively impact its own business interests,” said Jason Kint, chief executive of Digital Content Next, a trade association for online publishers that has argued online tech platforms are harming competition and consumers. Google’s digital ad business uses data on users collected partially through cookies.


    Chetna Bindra, Google’s senior product manager for trust and privacy, said the criticism “misstates the intent of what we’re trying to do. It’s more about broadening this conversation beyond cookies.”


    The debate extends to the issue of who benefits financially from browser cookies. Google cited its own research showing that publishers lose an average of 52% of their advertising revenue when their readers block cookies.


    The results differ substantially from an academic study published this spring, which found that publishers only receive about 4% more ad revenue for an ad impression that has a cookie enabled than for one that doesn’t.



    NervyHitch.com